Lego Batman Movie Maker Set – Full Review

So last week we posted a very short Lego Batman animation that we made using the new Lego Batman Movie Maker set. This week we are going to take a more in-depth look at the set and let you know our thoughts on it.

Lego Batman was huge at the cinemas and after the success of The Lego Movie, there really was no surprise that it was going to do well. Batman is a massive DC Comics franchise on its own, so when combined with peoples love of the iconic bricks and minifigures, it is no wonder that Lego have produced a large new range of Lego Batman toys to go alongside the movie. One of the sets in this range particularly caught our eye for how different it was from the other sets and how appropriate it was to what we do here at minifiguremotion.com – stop motion animation.

The Lego Batman Movie Maker set is aimed at people who want to make stop motion animations with their smartphones, and consists of a stage, a double sided print cardboard backdrop of Gotham and the Bat Cave and a camera rig which consists of a cradle that can hold your smartphone that can tilt, pivot and pan, allowing you to add some cool camera movements to your animations.

The set consists of 152 parts, a lot of which are the Lego technic style bits, which allow for the camera movements. The build is pretty simple, as you can see in the speed build video, but there were a few little tricky bits getting the moving parts together. The stage is very basic, but includes two 45 degree angle plates, which allow the backdrop to wrap around slightly at each end. The backdrop is held onto the stage by small block areas on the stage that have small blue axels protruding from the back of them that match up neatly with the 3 holes in the bottom of the backdrop. Simply choose which side of the backdrop you want to use, push the blue axels through the holes and secure it with 3 yellow spacers and you actually have quite a solid film set.

But it is the camera rig that really makes this set worth having…

Your smartphone sits in a cradle that is adjustable, so should fit almost any standard size phone that you are using. We have used it with an iPhone, Samsung Galaxy and iPod Touch and they all fit well with hardly any camera wobble. The phone is secured by three rubber joints which can be pushed up/down to hold the phone firmly and because they are rubber rather than the standard Lego plastic, there should be no scratching to your phone either.

I currently use a camera rig made of of some old vintage Lego skis and a few technic bits to hold the camera tight, and it has done me proud for a few years now, but, the shots it allows me are limited to either left or right pan, or zoom in/out. The camera rig in the Lego Batman set however offers much more choice.

To start with, there is a very limited zoom in/out ability, which quite simply allows you move the camera back or forth down a lego baseplate… this requires moving the whole rig up off the studs and manually repositioning it, so doesn’t make for a very smooth zoom on camera. But, still it does allow you to set up different shots at different camera lengths, if a little limited in scope.

Panning left or right compared to zooming is very smooth, mainly because the camera cradle is fixed into a slotted carrier which allows for very gentle movements with almost no friction to worry about. The distance you can move left or right it quite limited, about 6cm, but this is easily changed just by finding some more parts from your Lego box and extending the length of the carrier.

In the photos you will see a wheel on the front of the camera rig, and this controls the tilt of the camera cradle, which is probably the largest movement that the rig allows, with an arc of about 160 degrees to move the camera through, allowing the camera to look up into the ‘sky’ or down to the floor. We used this effect in the Batercise test animation we filmed.

Lastly is the ability to be able to pivot the camera, around a central point that fixes to the stage with a socket and ball joint. This allows to you to turn the camera through that central point with about a 70 degree arc to move around. This is great for tracking shots, maybe as a car drives past, or a mini figure walks by. The movement isn’t as smooth as the panning or tilting, but it still is very effective if used carefully.

The set also comes with the one and only Lego Batman mini figure and a whole host of accessories including a Batarang and Grapple gun. There are some very limited instructions on setting up and stop motion animation, but I would have liked to have seen something a little more comprehensive for the total beginners. That said it is great to see Lego producing sets like this, which promote creativity and other skills that can be learnt with their products.

For £15.99 from Lego.com this set is a fantastic addition for beginners and more advanced Brickfilmers and I for one will be keeping the camera rig built for use in other animations.

Check out last wells animation below!

We hope you found this review helpful and hope you visit back soon!

Keep animating,

Ian

Batercise – A test animation with the Lego Batman Movie Maker set!

 

This is a quick test animation we have done to check out the Lego Batman Movie Maker Set, a new set from Lego aimed at Brickfilmers who use smartphones to make their movies. The 152 piece set allows you to build a small stage, with double sided backdrop and a camera rig. The rig includes a cradle for a smartphone that pans, tilts and pivots. The whole point of the animation was to test out the functionality of the camera rig and see how its movements could be used in a short film. Batman comes with the set, so we let him make a short appearance and this was the result.

We will be doing a more in-depth review of the set next week, so look out for that soon, but in short it was fun to use, gave me camera movements I haven’t had before and I will be keeping it built for use in my upcoming animations to see if it can add anything! I like that Lego are also encouraging other skills associated with their product, and would definitely like to see more ideas like this from them. On that note, I have also noticed that the official Lego Movie Maker app has disappeared from the app store, so I am wondering if we might see a new and improved version of the app with a Lego Batman branding sometime soon to compliment this set? Let me know what you think in the comments!

The Batman Theme is something I put together a few years back for the kids to sing on, so I repurposed it for this!

It was filmed on a 5th gen iPod Touch in Stop Motion Studio!

Featured Animator – Designasaur

This time we take a slightly different look at animation, moving away from plastic minifigures to look at an animator with a self appointed PHD in Plasticine!

Name: Designasaur
Location: UK

1. How long have you been animating?
I made my first stop motion film about 8 years ago and haven’t really stopped animating since then.

2. How did you start making stop frame animation?
I’d made a character (a little snail) out of plasticine for fun and thought that it would be cool to animate it. I set up at my kitchen table, shot a little clip using an old digital camera and edited the stills together in Windows Movie Maker.

3. What medium do you prefer to work in and why?
It has to be plasticine. While it’s not the most durable material, it’s fun to work with and there’s so much that you can do with it. You can be really intricate and artistic with it or a bit more messy and expressive and still achieve something that looks great.

4. What is your setup like? Which camera and software do you use to make your movies?
At the minute, I use a Canon 450D camera with Dragonframe stop motion software. For lighting, I use F&V LED lights and edit my films in Adobe Premiere Pro.

5. On average, how many hours does it take to create your films?
It varies from project to project. Currently, I make a one minute film every week for a Youtube channel using two characters over a plain white background, which takes around two and a half days. I’ve recently signed off on a music video, however that took around six months to complete and involves a full set, backdrop, props and several characters. The music video is only two minutes in length, but a lot more went into the production process.

6. Do you have a favourite character to animate, and what makes them so special?
I’ve animated a clay version of Cookie Monster a few times which is always fun, but in terms of my own work, my go to character is always a bear. I feel like if I had to choose a mascot, it’d be a bear because they’re adorable and full of personality.

7.  What can we look forward to in the near future from you?
Tough question! I’ve made a couple of adverts and a music video which have been really fun, so I’d love to do more work like that. I also love making my own short films and I’ve had an idea in mind for a little while now, but I know it’ll take a very long time to complete, so it’s all about finding the time to set aside for it. In short, more films.

8. Where can people go for more information or to view your animations?
www.Designasaur.co.uk
I’m also on Instagram (@dr_Designasaur), Twitter and Facebook (as Designasaur) if you want to say hello!

9. What one piece of advice do you have for people wanting to start in stop-frame animation?
Just start. You don’t need much to get going – just a camera and an object/character/drawing that you want to animate. There are loads of apps or free programmes that you can download now to edit your film together and share it online. You can even do it on your phone. Your first film probably isn’t going to be your masterpiece, but keep going and you’ll improve with every project.

Featured Video:

Lego Star Wars – Clone Commander Rex Minifigure Comparison

LEGO® Clones – Rip-Offs VS Official LEGO® Products

Front: Official LEGO Rex (left), Copy Rex (right)

Back: Official LEGO Rex (left), Copy Rex (right)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As a website that concentrates on manipulating LEGO minifigures to create animations, we are often looking for new minifigures to be the actors in our films. The LEGO Collectible Minifigure Series are often easy to get hold of at a decent price, but if you want a minifigure from a specific set, but don’t want to spend the money on buying the whole set, then that minifigure can often be harder to get your hands on and a lot more expensive.

Because of that, it is not surprising that people have started to produce ‘custom’ minifigures, that are available to buy on ebay, amazon and other online stores for a cheaper price. Some custom minifigure manufacturers use real LEGO parts that are stripped of their print and properly pad printed with their own unique, original designs, like the guys over at Minifigures.com do to produce high quality custom figures, but other manufacturers are producing blatant rip-offs of LEGO’s original designs, printed (or sometimes stickered) onto cheaper LEGO compatible parts. We thought we would take a look at one of these blatant rip-offs and compare it against the original LEGO product to see how they compare to see if these cheaper copies are really worth your money… For this copy comparison we aptly chose Phase II Clone Commander Rex of the 501st Legion from the LEGO Star Wars Set 75012. We bought the official LEGO minifigure from Bricklink.com and his cheaper counterpart from eBay.co.uk

The original LEGO version of Rex is up to the usual high standards that they produce. With well detailed, sharp pad printing on the front/back of the torso and legs, the colours are strong and bold with a high level of accuracy to the character from the Star Wars films and animated series The Clone Wars. The phase II clone helmet looks great, with fantastic moulding and fine detailed printing with accurate representations of Rex’s signature Jaig Eye markings and tally marks that he is so well known for. The head underneath is similar to the original LEGO Star Wars minifigure clone heads, but with added ‘midnight shadow’ stubble to give Rex a bit more individuality. To finish the character off nicely he also includes a blue and black shoulder Pauldron and a black Kama belt cape. All of the pieces fit snuggly together, with enough friction to hold the arms and legs firm but moveable at the same time, and the helmet fits the head perfectly.

In stark contrast to the official LEGO Rex, the copy, despite looking pretty good on first glance, had obvious problems from the moment I opened the package. Firstly, the legs would not connect to the body properly, with hardly any friction between the parts to keep them together, and the legs regularly separating from the torso without any effort. The arms were similar, lacking in any kind of interference, so the arms spun freely within the joint of the body, making it practically impossible to put the arms in any other pose than down by his sides. Similarly, the phase II clone helmet, which is slightly shorter and squatter than the original, doesn’t quite fit on to the stud of the head, making it move around lots and not stay in one place. Print wise, the lines are soft and not as fine, with the colours being weaker, paler versions than that of the original LEGO counterpart and the design having been more or less copied exactly from the original. The figures face is a poor representation of the original, and across all of the elements the moulding and plastic quality of the product doesn’t feel as well made. The shoulder Pauldron is just black, as is the Kama belt-cape.

Overall, the Rex copy minifigure, despite being a much cheaper purchase, is vastly inferior to LEGO‘s original in almost every way, from print, through to build quality. As an animator, good quality printing looks better ‘on film’ and the lack of friction on the arms and legs makes it very hard to pose the figure effectively for animation movements. This, to us, really proves the old adage of “you get what you pay for” and although money is sometimes a deciding factor in what and how we do things in life, sometimes it is better to wait until you can pay for the slightly superior product. So next time you need a specific minifigure for your animations, we’d recommend you stick with the official LEGO product or go to a company like Minifigures.com or Firestartoys.com who you can trust to sell you quality product.

Thanks for reading and check back soon! Until then, keep animating!

The Playtrix – The Matrix Parody Animation

Hi guys,

So firstly let me apologise for our absence the past few months. Real life really took hold as we fought injuries, illness, increased work loads and other problems. All the while I was getting itchy to create, but for the past few months I have had to give over my energy to all those other things, so it was great this long weekend to be able to sit down with some spare time and finish up a few projects that needed some love and attention!

The Playtrix was something that has been left unfinished on my hard drive for a few months now, so I sat and done some editing and voice recording to get it complete. It was my first attempt at combining Stop Motion Animation with live action video and I think it worked out pretty well. No Matrix parody would work without some special FX either, so some green screening, overlaying and compositing later and computer screens were displaying, bullets were whizzing and Dragons were flying! Big thanks goes out to Rich Wildman who helped out with the Special FX and lent his voice to Morpheus, as well as to Morgan, Evie and Toni for making the live action part of this with me…

As ever, thanks to the guys over at Firestar Toys, www.firestartoys.com who constantly offer their support and products in helping us create our films! Go check them out for all your minifigure parts needs!

So, follow the white rabbit and enter The Playtrix, and we hope you enjoy our new animation!

Christmas Animation (or lack thereof…)

So, its that time of year when the cupboards are full of nice food, the decorations are up, the kids (and parents) are excited and everyone is publishing their Christmas animations… Except for us that is…

We were all ready to do a couple of Christmas based animations, the sets were built, the ideas were storyboarded, voice actors were ready… and then I woke one Saturday morning with amazingly horrible pains in my left hand. I don’t know how or why, but my palm was swollen, I could barely grip or pick anything up, my hand was barely usable and on the advice of a Pharmacist, I was strapped up in a splint for just over a week. I am on the road to recovery; the swelling has now gone done, and I have use of my hand back, but some of the pain is still there and my grip is a lot weaker than it was. It was unfortunately a major set back on animating, there was no way I could make the fine movement of the Lego figures with one hand disabled, so we have had to put them on hold for now…

We also normally write a Christmas song every year, with a cynical, comedic edge, but once again I had problems with this, as it is very hard to play a guitar with a gammy hand… In the end we settled for doing a quick A Capella song called Commercials Of Festive Delights and you can listen to it here:
http://www.icompositions.com/music/song.php?sid=219475

We wish everyone a very Merry Christmas and a prosperous, animated New Year and look forward to sharing more Lego love with everyone in 2017… Until then take care and keep animating!

Ian Husbands!

BrickLive Show at Birmingham NEC with FirestarToys.com – Oct 28th-30th 2016

img_8393So this weekend I jumped in the car and headed up the M40 to the NEC in Birmingham for my first ever big LEGO® exhibition. The guys over at FirestarToys.com had struck a deal with me that they would allocate some space on their stand to advertise and promote Minifiguremotion.com if I could help on the stand selling their product. So, armed with a showreel of animations, flyers and posters I jumped at the chance to join them.

Last time I was at the NEC I was singing there in my band fREAK-1-C and I had forgotten just how big the place is. It is the 7th largest exhibition centre in Europe and Brick Live as a show claims to be the UK’s biggest celebration of LEGO®, built by LEGO® fans for LEGO® fans, where the World’s best builders gather to display their creations, combined with trade stalls, computer games and even a stage hosting live events. Everywhere you looked, as far as the eye could see, was an massive homage to the little plastic brick and the minifigures that live in that world.

Over 3 million bricks filled the various Brick Pits that were everywhere throughout the hall, each containing its own unique colour brick, with fans, young and old alike, wading through the plastic to sit and make various creations. Many LEGO® fans had shown up to display their builds, with amateur builders and pro LEGO® artists showing off everything from spaceships, towns, cars, castles and even recreations and parodies of famous artworks. People queued for hours to play the latest LEGO® Dimensions games and every so often you could catch a glimpse of a life-sized LEGO® BA Baracus (Mr T.) or Harry Potter wondering around for photo opportunities with children and adults alike.

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Once you had spent your time looking at all the great displays, building in the Brick Pits or getting involved in the various events on the live stage and other spots around the hall, there were plenty of trade stalls to go and purchase minifigures, LEGO® sets and various other related products. Besides the FirestarToys.com and Minifigures.com stall where I was working, who produce some fantastic, unique custom minifigures, lego parts and custom accessories, a few other stand out stalls included the guys over at RedSquareBrick.com who make some awesome minifigure display frames, BaseAce.co.uk who manufacture some very interesting 3D play platforms for minifigures and the very cool Funky3DFaces.com who 3D print minifigure heads that look just like you, or anyone whose photo you decided to send them. A massive Toys’R’Us also dominated a large portion of the hall, selling all official LEGO® product, so whatever it was you wanted to buy, at Brick Live you could probably find it.

The FirestarToys.comMinifigures.com stand was absolutely non-stop for the 3 days that I worked with them, with both children and adults alike queuing up to take part in their Create Your Own Superhero and Make A Monster sections, or pondering over the many quality printed custom minifigures that were on sale. Stan Lee, Tom Baker, Ghost Soldier and Jack The Pumpkin King were firm show favourites, and we were also joined by the hugely talented Elspeth De Montes of Azure Brick Creations who built all of the great displays used to promote the figures at Minifigures.com. I also had the opportunity to meet and talk with many of you that were interested in Stop Motion Animation and it was great to hear that so many younger children were already trying their hand at creating their own Brick Films.

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As of writing this, I am tired, my legs and feet ache, and I am slightly bricked-out, but that said, attending Brick Live with the FirestarToys.com crew was an amazing experience that I hope to be a part of again sometime. I cannot thank Paul, Danny, Sonny, Elspeth, Matt, Lucy and Lewis enough for making me feel welcome and like part of the team, and I look forward to working with them all again and spending some more nights after shows playing pool and drinking with them.

I hope to see you all at a show in the near future, and until then, keep animating!

Happy Halloween

Holidays are always good themes to use for animating, and with Lego making a great range of Horrow/Halloween themed Minifigures, we just couldn’t resist the temptation this year… We used minifigures from the Collectibles Series, Scooby Doo and Dr Who to bring the horror to life, plus some great Skull heads from the wonderful custom minifig manufactureres Crazy Bricks – http://crazybricks.bigcartel.com/products

Both Morgan and I made animations with Morgan using Minecraft Movie Creator on his Kindle, and myself using Stop Motion Studio on the iPad with an iPhone 4s as a remote camera! We hope you enjoy our little slices of horror themed animations and wish you all a HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

MORGAN’S ANIMATION:

 

iMotion App on 5th Gen iPod Touch

imotionscreen1As we continue to look at Stop Motion Animation apps for smartphones and tablets, our next stop is the iMotion App from Fingerlabs and this time we test it on a 5th Gen iPod Touch, with a 5mp iSight Camera.

iMotion is available across the iPhone, iPad and iPod range from the iTunes store and can be downloaded for FREE for the basic version. To get the added extras like Manual Focus, Exposure, Onion Skinning and White Balance control is going to cost you £2.99, but at that price, it really is worth it.

With heaps of features, iMotion is definitely one of the better apps out there for animating on a smart device. It can shoot video in 720p HD or 1080p HD as either time-lapse photography or as stop motion animation, with 3 triggers for capturing the photos, those being manually, by clicking the onscreen capture button, remotely by connecting another iDevice with the iMotion Remote App running or via microphone. The videos can be made in either portrait or landscape mode, autosave as you go and can be set to variable frame rates to suit your animation techniques. In the full paid version, once your animation is done, a few extra tools allow you to add other photos from your camera roll or music from your Music library, or, if you are feeling creative, you can record your own sounds with the built in mic. Once you are happy with all of that you can export your finished animation out to your camera roll, or to the iTunes share, Facebook, Youtube or email.

imotioncapturescreenDespite being a powerful little App for Stop Motion, I did find that iMotion lacked a few things that other apps have. Firstly was the editing capability. It seems that frames can only be deleted after the image capture process has taken place, and you can’t see the actual timeline of photos as you take them. That means if you make a mistake, or the camera focuses wrongly (like it can do with autofocus on) you have to wait until you have finished your animation to edit it out. Once you have finished an animation, you can go back and delete or add frames, but if you have moved the camera, this can get quite frustrating. There are no preset titles or theme music that are built into the App, although with the ability to import music and pics from the iPod itself, you could always create your own titles and songs in other apps and import them in to add that finished look to your animation. The manual capture on the iPod worked well, but you got the obvious camera wobble and I found the capture button to be in a rather inconvenient place, the middle bottom of the screen, which my camera rig got in the way of,making it difficult to snap those shots… So I tried the microphone trigger and struggled to get that working at all, so finally I looked at the remote control trigger via my iPhone running the iMotion Remote app… This worked really well, except there was no sound alerting me that the shot had been taken, which honestly did confuse me a few times, meaning I took the same shot 2 or 3 times before realising it had already been taken… In the videos below you can see both the manual capture and remote trigger being used for image capture.

All in all, iMotion is a pretty solid little app, that at only £2.99 for the full package you can’t really complain about. It is full of great features and regular use would help iron out some of the down sides as you got more and more used to working with it. I will definitely be keeping this on my iPod, just in case I am out and about and feel the need to animate!

 

Stop Motion Studio on Windows Nokia Lumia 635 Review

ethanwindows2Recently, I wanted an app for my Windows Nokia Lumia 635 Phone, for when I’m out of the house, and needed to make some stop motion videos. I came across an app called Stop Motion Studio, from Cateater LLC.

Before I get into the app, I would like to mention the range of stop motion apps on the Windows store. I searched the Windows App Store for a while, and unfortunately, only came across one app. As the Windows phone isn’t that popular, I assume this is the reason why that there are not many stop motion programs, which means you are restricted to the one app – Stop Motion Studio. But does it suit your brickfilming needs? Barely.

I can’t say I’m happy. While this app does have its pros – such as its basic layout, and a free download, the cons make the app very frustrating to use.

THE POSITIVES:

The app is FREE to download
This is great, which makes it very accessible to people who may not want to spend money on stop motion just yet, or people who want to try out stop-motion for the first time.

The BASIC layout makes it EASY TO USE
When using the app, I found it quite easy to get to certain tools. Tools are labeled, or had a practical symbol to represent it. An example is the capture tool, a simple symbol of a camera and below, clearly labeled “capture” which tells me that this where you tap to take photos.

Other Cool Features that I liked:

  • The frame rate of your animation can be controlled from 1 FPS – 30 FPS which is great, compared to the other apps I have seen where the FPS doesn’t go past 10.
  • The gallery is pretty sweet, and gives newcomers an idea on stopmotion (but for some reason, they all seem to have been made using the iPhone version of the app, shouldn’t they be featuring stopmotions made using the Windows Phone?)

ethanwindowsreview1THE NEGATIVES:

Very frustrating to export animations.
When I was done finishing a little short animation which I was happy with, I was hoping to share it to a couple of mates. When I tapped on the option to save, chose the quality and chose the folder I wanted to store my animation in, right after – the app crashed! After trying multiple times, using the same process – no matter what I do, it still crashed! This is very frustrating to those who want to save it to your album, or share with friends or YouTube. I am hoping they will fix it in a future update.

I did, however, find an option to email it to myself, which I can then send it to a computer or another device. That however, comes at the price of image quality as there is no option to choose what quality to send in, which in the end, was not worth it.

Most features are LOCKED and cost WAY TOO MUCH for what it is worth
While the app is free to use, most features of the app, are locked, and are unlocked by purchasing an add on pack. For features as small as adding title cards and adding in your own voice? They should have been included without buying it! I could understand locking features such as green screening or a draw tool, but for titles cards and adding audio, is just ridiculous. Especially when the iPhone version has way more features than this and most of it is free!

Other stuff that bugged me:

  • Losing animation for unknown reason (went to export to realise that the animation was gone?? Very confused there)
  • Buttons are not sensitive enough when tapping the capture button (meaning having to press hard and having the risk of bumping the camera
  • No onion skin layering 🙁
  • Playback feature is laggy and buggy
  • Windows Phone camera has average quality at 5 mega pixel (this isn’t much a negative with the app, but more to do with the phone itself)

The app has potential to be a great tool for stop motion. But due to its locked features and a lot of glitches, I do not think I will be using the app, in the near future. Very disappointed. I will continue to search for stop motion apps that works for windows phones and hopefully, one day, I will find an app that will be suit my brickfilming needs, and hopefully yours too.

Review by Ethan from ETR FILMS – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC165_0uo32KgnnqJGB_tgog